Archive for the 'a Treatment for Addiction part 1' Category

Nov 17 2011

Massage: Hands Down, a Treatment for Addiction Part 6

Finishing touch
When we understand the power that touch brings, as the ancient physicians did, massage becomes a natural adjunct to treatment. The staff at the Crossroads Centre in Antigua, West Indies, recognizes this. In turn, some of the highest-rated activities clients discuss during exit interviews are the massage sessions and other holistic components of the program.
Addiction is a powerful, multifaceted disease, but as we know, it can be arrested. Clients in treatment deserve the best of all dimensions in care, so that they are optimally prepared to succeed in recovery. Massage therapy plays a role and is earning its place at the table of addiction treatment.

Joni Kosakoski, BSN, RN, CARN ( admit@crossroadsantigua.org ) has practiced nursing for more than 25 years, the last 10 specializing in addictions. She is a member of the American Holistic Nurses Association and The International Nurses Society on Addictions.

References
Collinge,W. and Duhl, L.(1997). American Holistic Health Association Complete Guide to Alternative Medicine. New York: Warner Books.
Dossey, B., Keegan, L. & Guzzetta, C. (2000) Holistic Nursing: A handbook for practice, Third edition. New York: Aspen Publishers, Inc., p.618.
Field, T. (2002). Massage therapy. Medical Clinics of North America, 86, 163-171.
Lidell, L., Thomas, S., & Beresford-Cooke, C. (2001). The Book of Massage: The Complete Step-by-Step Guide to Eastern and Western Techniques. New York: Fireside.
Montagu, A. & Matson, F. (1979). The Human Connection. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., pp. 89-90.
Touch Research Institute. (2003). Massage therapy database. Available: www.miami.edu/touch-research/Massage
1.html
Various authors. (December/January 2003). Massage and Bodywork, 17, 6. Selected articles on addiction and reprints available: www.massageandbodywork.com

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Nov 17 2011

Massage: Hands Down, a Treatment for Addiction Part 5

Massage for clients’ body, mind, and spirit
Becoming aware of where one unconsciously holds the tension in the body turns into a wonderful advantage for clients working to identify and manage triggers, and learning how to deal with cravings and stress in general. Often, a part of the body or some sort of physical sensation can be the first notice one will receive as stress levels increase. Having a heightened kinesthetic sense and an improved awareness of habitual areas of tension in the body can provide the client with additional cues that not only may help prevent relapse, but also bring a growing respect and awe for the gift of our physical body, which for some exemplifies a Higher Power.

Mentally and emotionally, attitudes and feelings can be difficult to change or even access for the newly sober individual. Being in denial, intellectualizing, and avoiding emotions frequently hinder a full surrender to the recovery process. Referring clients to massage and bodywork can help therapists gain access to the most mentally defended individual, as massage directs attention away from the familiar region of the mind to physical realms with which they are less familiar and therefore less able to defend. Emotional release can commonly occur with massage, which provides a safe, non-threatening opportunity to begin the process of recovering long-buried emotions and memories. In this way, psychotherapeutic interventions can be greatly enhanced within the treatment setting.

Spiritually, the deep relaxation and gentle touch provided by massage can be the beginning of reconnecting with the self and ending the painful isolation every addicted person experiences. The touch of the massage therapist can powerfully, yet subtly allow a person both the opportunity to feel grounded or centered for the first time and the ability to truly be in the present moment. It also presents the opportunity to gain new insights and a deeper understanding of psychological issues and can be a valuable component of anyone’s self-care regimen. To allow oneself to surrender to the practitioner’s hands — to breathe fully and easily, to acknowledge and receive the gifts of nurturing, surrender, and relaxation — is a precious part of living the human experience and an invaluable addition to the newly recovering person’s repertoire of relapse-prevention skills.

Joni Kosakoski, BSN, RN, CARN ( admit@crossroadsantigua.org ) has practiced nursing for more than 25 years, the last 10 specializing in addictions. She is a member of the American Holistic Nurses Association and The International Nurses Society on Addictions.

References
Collinge,W. and Duhl, L.(1997). American Holistic Health Association Complete Guide to Alternative Medicine. New York: Warner Books.
Dossey, B., Keegan, L. & Guzzetta, C. (2000) Holistic Nursing: A handbook for practice, Third edition.
New York: Aspen Publishers, Inc., p.618.
Field, T. (2002). Massage therapy. Medical Clinics of North America, 86, 163-171.
Lidell, L., Thomas, S., & Beresford-Cooke, C. (2001). The Book of Massage: The Complete Step-by-Step Guide to Eastern and Western Techniques. New York: Fireside.
Montagu, A. & Matson, F. (1979). The Human Connection. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., pp. 89-90.
Touch Research Institute. (2003). Massage therapy database. Available: www.miami.edu/touch-research/Massage
1.html
Various authors. (December/January 2003). Massage and Bodywork, 17, 6. Selected articles on addiction and reprints available: www.massageandbodywork.com

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Nov 04 2011

Massage: Hands Down, a Treatment for Addiction Part 3

Types and effects of massage
With so many different types of massage therapy and bodywork from which to choose, practitioners often blend several styles to fit their own individual philosophy, training, and intent (for an excellent, thorough review of massage therapy, see the ç chapter in Collinge & Duhl, 1997). Some massage techniques focus less on the manipulation of musculature and soft tissue and more on the integration and structure of all body parts. Oriental styles incorporate the principles of Chinese medicine and serve to maintain the flow of energy, or chi, through meridians, the energy circuits of the body. In addition, there are other energy-based modalities, such as therapeutic touch, where it is not always necessary to touch the body for positive responses, following the principle that the human energy field extends 2 to 4 inches beyond the skin and can be balanced by the actions and the intent of the practitioner.
Complementary medicine of all varieties is becoming increasingly more mainstream, a trend that will most likely continue. Unfortunately, limited research has been done in this area. This fact is changing, due in part to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM). Founded in 1992 by the National Institutes of Health in response to public interest, NCCAM (formerly the Office of Alternative Medicine) is now scientifically researching and evaluating alternative health modalities and funding independent research grants. Currently, many studies are also being conducted at the Miami, Florida-based Touch Research Institute (TRI), the only center in the world today devoted solely to the scientific exploration of touch and its application in healing disease.

Since TRI was established in 1991 by the University of Miami School of Medicine, the Institute has been responsible for research that has yielded significant scientific findings regarding massage and its effects on the body, among them: decreased pain, diminished autoimmune responses, enhanced immune response, increased alertness and performance, and enhanced growth in premature infants. Many of the effects appear to be related to the reduction in stress hormones, most notably cortisol, which occurs as the result of massage therapy (Field, 2002; TRI 2003). Several TRI studies completed in the past five years involve massage and addictions — specifically nicotine, bulimia, and cocaine-exposed newborns. These studies positively document the ability of massage to decrease anxiety, agitation, and cravings as well as improve sleep and lessen feelings of depression (TRI, 2003).

Joni Kosakoski, BSN, RN, CARN ( admit@crossroadsantigua.org ) has practiced nursing for more than 25 years, the last 10 specializing in addictions. She is a member of the American Holistic Nurses Association and The International Nurses Society on Addictions.

References
Collinge,W. and Duhl, L.(1997). American Holistic Health Association Complete Guide to Alternative Medicine. New York: Warner Books.
Dossey, B., Keegan, L. & Guzzetta, C. (2000) Holistic Nursing: A handbook for practice, Third edition. New York: Aspen Publishers, Inc., p.618.
Field, T. (2002). Massage therapy. Medical Clinics of North America, 86, 163-171.
Lidell, L., Thomas, S., & Beresford-Cooke, C. (2001). The Book of Massage: The Complete Step-by-Step Guide to Eastern and Western Techniques. New York: Fireside.
Montagu, A. & Matson, F. (1979). The Human Connection. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., pp. 89-90.
Touch Research Institute. (2003). Massage therapy database. Available: www.miami.edu/touch-research/Massage
1.html
Various authors. (December/January 2003). Massage and Bodywork, 17, 6. Selected articles on addiction and reprints available: www.massageandbodywork.com

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Oct 01 2011

Massage: Hands Down, a Treatment for Addiction part 1

Massage is often labeled an alternative therapy in addiction treatment. Yet today’s evolving integrative health paradigm acknowledges massage, along with other body therapies, as a natural and logical instrument of human healing. The scientific study of massage is in its infancy, but recent research documents the effectiveness of massage and bears implications for the treatment of and recovery from addiction.

First, the meaning of touch
Even before human bodies become full bodies, touch is the first of the five senses to develop in the embryo and the most vital for survival (Dossey, B., Keegan, L. & Guzzetta, C., 2000). The skin is the largest sense organ of the body; a piece of skin the size of a quarter contains more than 3 million cells, 12 feet of nerves and approximately 900,000 sensory receptors (Dossey et al., 2000; Montagu & Matson, 1979). From this perspective, the skin is a giant communication system that, through touch, brings messages from a person’s external environment to his or her internal attention.

Given the potential powerful effects of touch, massage can play an important role in all aspects of recovery from addictions — from detoxification, when it is a valuable healing tool, through primary inpatient or outpatient treatment, when it increases awareness and promotes relaxation, to post-treatment, when it contributes to relapse prevention strategies, stress management, and the body’s innate healing power that leads to optimal health in recovery.

Joni Kosakoski, BSN, RN, CARN ( admit@crossroadsantigua.org ) has practiced nursing for more than 25 years, the last 10 specializing in addictions. She is a member of the American Holistic Nurses Association and The International Nurses Society on Addictions.

References
Collinge,W. and Duhl, L.(1997). American Holistic Health Association Complete Guide to Alternative Medicine. New York: Warner Books.
Dossey, B., Keegan, L. & Guzzetta, C. (2000) Holistic Nursing: A handbook for practice, Third edition. New York: Aspen Publishers, Inc., p.618.
Field, T. (2002). Massage therapy. Medical Clinics of North America, 86, 163-171.
Lidell, L., Thomas, S., & Beresford-Cooke, C. (2001). The Book of Massage: The Complete Step-by-Step Guide to Eastern and Western Techniques. New York: Fireside.
Montagu, A. & Matson, F. (1979). The Human Connection. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., pp. 89-90.
Touch Research Institute. (2003). Massage therapy database. Available: www.miami.edu/touch-research/Massage
1.html
Various authors. (December/January 2003). Massage and Bodywork, 17, 6. Selected articles on addiction and reprints available: www.massageandbodywork.com

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